Feb 132014
 

If you missed Part One, you can read it here.

If you missed Part Two, you can read it here.

Happiness.  Once I got over the horror of seeing all the men scattering to pee, I was able to be in the moment and just be happy.  I was actually doing this.  Running in a huge Disney Race.  Something so many people wanted to do, but couldn’t for whatever reason.  I found my stride, focused and pushed forward.  Every so often I took a moment and scanned the crowd for Dan.  Because I’m slow and he’s quick, I was able to see him several times during the race! I can’t begin to describe what a great feeling it is to see someone you love cheering you on. There’s just a little push you feel in your heart to continue on.

Getting a little push from my husband to keep going!

Getting a little push from my husband to keep going!

Tears. Yes, I realize tears aren’t an emotion, but I’m not sure what word best describes what I felt over and over and over again while running this race.

I will never forget the person who gave me two thumbs up at the 4-mile mark.  Tears came and I got another push to keep moving forward.

Or the person who cheered for me and told me I was doing a great job as she ran with me for a while.  More tears and yet another push.

The person who told me to stay strong.  A few more tears and another push.

The moment I rounded the corner and began mile six.  It was in that moment that I shed the most tears.  Because that moment is when I saw just how many people were still behind me.  It was then that I knew for sure I would not get swept.  That I would absolutely finish this race.  It was the final push I needed to run harder, run faster and finish what I had started so many months ago.

Disney Bib - 61216

Disney Bib – 61216

Joy.  Crossing that finish line and receiving my medal?  Pure joy.

Disney 10K Finisher!  My time was 1:32.  Not the fastest, but I managed to stay in the top 2/3 across the board (age, gender and overall).  I'm happy with those results!

Disney 10K Finisher! My time was 1:32. Not the fastest, but I managed to stay in the top 2/3 across the board (age, gender and overall). I’m happy with those results!

Pride. Yes, I am most definitely proud of myself.  I worked hard to run this race.  I overcame surgery & setbacks in recovery, injury, and life to train for this race.

But just as important, I felt great pride because I ran this race to support Team Up! with Autism Speaks. With the help of family and friends I raised $775.00, which not only goes to support Autism Speaks, but also allowed me to be one of the top fundraisers during Marathon Weekend!  If you donated, thank you, thank you, thank you!  Your generosity will help countless families as they navigate the waters of autism.

(Left to Right) Top Row-shirt, awards dinner, starting line Bottom Row-running, certificate, finisher pic

(Left to Right)
Top Row-shirt, awards dinner, starting line
Bottom Row-running, certificate, finisher pic

Feb 122014
 

If you missed Part One, you can read it here.

Warning:  This post contains potty talk.  Literally!

 

Horror.  I’ve shared this with pretty much everyone who’s asked me about the race, but I think it warrants talking about one more time.  Let’s be honest for a minute.  The one thing that has scared me about races more than anything, and I mean ANYTHING, is the port-o-potty.  After having a dozen or so races under my belt I have since gotten over my fear of them.  Anyway, when the fireworks went off and my corral was off and running, we weren’t two minutes outside of the starting line before the men in the race started running off course to pee!  Seriously.  It was ridiculous.  I was truly horrified at how many men I saw peeing all over Disney property.  I thought, “Can they not wait until they get to the port-o-potty?  They aren’t that far away!”.

And then…

I was about a mile in to the race when I passed the first bank of potties.  The line was crazy.  Men and women alike were waiting.  I had no need for one, so I kept on going.  Mile two brought another potty.  ONE potty and another line.  And that’s when I changed my tune.  I thought, “Why are these men taking up precious space in line when they can go pee in the bushes right behind us?!?”  Dan has found great pleasure in retelling my tale of horror to everyone.  In the end, I would prefer to not see men (and the occasional woman) pee in public, but I certainly appreciate it when the line isn’t long for the potty when I need one!  (Oh, and for those wondering, that first bank of potties I passed?  There was an 18 minute wait to use them!  Don’t tell anyone, but I might have found a bush if I’d needed to go and there was an 18 minute wait!

To be continued…

Feb 112014
 

It’s been a little over a month since I ran my first 10K.  There are days I walk past the medal I earned and still can’t believe I ran 6.2 miles!

It was truly an amazing experience, and I don’t know that I will ever adequately be able to express what it was like to participate in it.  I’m pretty sure I experienced every emotion possible the day of my race.

Nerves.  I was so nervous and my stomach was in knots.  I’d spent the weeks leading up to the race both training for it AND having nightmares of getting swept for not going fast enough. And then I have the privilege of meeting Jeff Galloway, and he   eased my nerves and told me I would be just fine.  After all, I’d followed his training method, and he’s the expert.

Jeff Galloway - world class athlete and runner.  Author of the running program I used to train for my 10K.

Jeff Galloway – world class athlete and runner. Author of the running program I used to train for my 10K.

Second Thoughts.  We walked around the expo and all I could do was think about the next day.  What was I getting into?  And then I saw the words of Christopher Robin reminding me that I am brave, I am strong and I am smart.

Brave, Strong and Smart.

Brave, Strong and Smart.

Excitement.  I was so excited that I could not sleep the night before.  We went to bed before 9pm because we knew the alarm would ring at 3:15am.  I tossed and turned and dozed for an hour and eventually I pulled out a book and read until I finally fell asleep.

Inaugural T-Shirt sold at the Expo.

Inaugural T-Shirt sold at the Expo.

Anticipation.  We arrived at the corrals about 4:15am.  I made the HUGE mistake of crossing the line to use the port-o-potties reserved for the runners.  I had no idea when I crossed over I would not be able to go back.  The security guard let me hand off my extra stuff to Dan and then off I went to spend the next 90 minutes alone.  I wandered over to my corral (C – the third corral of five) and sat down and waited.  At one point a man stood in front of me and his shirt said, “Determined”.  I embraced the word and let that carry me through to the start.

Determined.

Determined.

To be continued…